How Do You Get Help For Someone Whos Addicted To Substance Abuse

Figuring out whether a substance use problem is mild, moderate, or severe should be the first step to getting someone help.

Substance use has impacts more than a million people in the United States directly, and if you include the indirect impact that number can skyrocket to over a million also. What this means is that you more than likely know someone who is currently struggling with an addiction, and at some point will need help to get the medical care that they need knowing what you can do then is an important part of the process.

Before you talk to your loved one about treatment options, you need to approach them about the problem. It’s important that you don’t confront your loved one in a way that will cause an argument. It’s common for those abusing drugs to get angry and defensive easily, so you need to approach the situation with care.

It’s natural to be afraid to approach your loved one about substance abuse, because of the uncertainty of how they will react. However, it could be a life-changing effort for you to overcome your apprehensions and have the conversation. You can approach your loved one with compassion and empathy and ask if they will consider getting the help they need.

A variety of addiction treatment centers and therapeutic approaches exist to best match the specific needs of each individual. Whether you’re looking for inpatient or outpatient treatment, there are many options out there for anyone looking to take their life back from addiction.

The journey is not an easy one, but long-term recovery is possible.

Addiction is not a singular event, but rather a progressive disease that worsens over time. It is indiscriminate and destroys the lives of all that follow its path. Residential treatment alone often yields only short-term sobriety and stabilization. Long-term recovery is achieved when there is abstinence from drugs and alcohol, abstinence from addictive behaviors, and recovery of physical, emotional and spiritual health. When recovery starts to feel as natural as a layer of skin, only then is it a healthy lifestyle that will sustain the individual well into the future.

Traditional talk therapy, group therapy and psychoeducational groups with a curriculum theoretically rooted in the four core concepts of DBT skills training provide the foundation of our clinical philosophy. Integrating evidence-based therapy with alternative holistic modalities focuses treatment on the whole person, rather than just the addiction, and is an effective resource in determining the meaning of the symptom.

You should never force someone into treatment, you can play an important role in talking them through these concerns. Consulting an addiction professional can help you organize an effective intervention. An interventionist can guide you and your family through the initial recovery process and advocate on your loved one’s behalf at a treatment facility. Expressing to your loved one how much they mean to you, encouraging them to get help, and sticking to your bottom line can be healing for the both of you. It can also encourage positive change.

The more you know about addiction and the treatment options that exist for the disease, the more help you can be to your friend or loved one that is struggling. The more you know, the better equipped you are to support your friend or loved one. As a friend or loved one, you can play an important role in helping someone get the support they need to overcome their substance use disorder. You should never think that you can solve the problem alone, and you should always seek out the support and guidance of a professional. Recovery from addiction is a process, not a destination.

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