How Do You Get Help For Someone Whos Addicted To Alcohol

Alcohol abuse exists when a person suffers damage to the financial situation, health, relationships, school, work or other parts of life but they continue to drink. Alcohol abuse becomes an addiction when the person has developed a tolerance to alcohol, that is, that they must drink much more than they used to, to get the same effect. If they stop drinking, they will experience withdrawal symptoms. A very heavy drinker can have such severe withdrawal symptoms that their very life can be in danger.

If you are wondering if there is a problem with a person’s drinking, here are the signs and symptoms:
-They go to work, school or other events drunk or hungover
-They drink despite the fact that they will be driving later
-They suffered illnesses or injuries related to drinking
-They have blackouts after drinking
-They have a physical condition that would be worsened by drinking but they still drink
-They acknowledged a problem with their drinking and perhaps even promised to stop but not changed a thing

Watch for these patterns of problem drinking. If these patterns persist, you need to seek alcohol rehabilitation to help your friend or loved one!

This section will guide you on how to help someone with an addiction. When someone struggles with addiction, it can have serious negative effects on their relationships with family, friends, and work colleagues. If you know or suspect that someone in your life suffers from alcohol addiction, you will probably want to help the one that you love, but this can be met with hostility or denial. Addiction is a chronic, relapsing brain disease, and the path to recovery for someone who is addicted is often a long and difficult one. This inevitably impacts those closest to them, and professional help may be needed to get them to treatment and into recovery.

It is important for family members and friends to recognize the signs and symptoms of addiction. These can differ depending on the type of addictions they are coping with, whether it be could be alcohol addiction. Many people are able to hide their addiction even from those closest to them, and it can be tempting to ignore the problem when that seems easier.

As much as you want to help your loved one, it is common for those who suffer from addiction to exhibit negative behaviors and attitudes when confronted about their using. Many people will react in the following ways:

Denial
Part of the reason that addiction is so difficult to manage and treat is that the person affected refuses to accept that they have a problem. It can be frustrating and confusing for those around the person affected to continue watching them behave in destructive ways and remain in denial when confronted.

Anger
When confronted, the person affected will deny they have a problem, and will commonly react in anger, initially or if pushed on the issue. People with an addiction will generally be feeling defensive and can turn aggressive if the issue of their use is raised. Even the “nicest” approach may be met with anger.

Avoidance
The person affected may start to avoid you, or avoid speaking about their problems, if they begin to feel “attacked”. A person with an addiction will often use as a coping method to avoid problems and may continue this avoidance behavior, starting to shut themselves away from you and other loved ones that confront them.

Whether you are trying to help someone who has never been admitted to treatment, or someone who was in recovery and is now relapsing, try these other steps. Compassion can be one of the greatest motivators that family and friends can use, as they encourage the addicted person to seek help. By showing compassion, the person suffering will feel more comfortable and able to open up, as well as understand how their actions are affecting you. Leading experts believe that empathy and social support can be key to getting people into treatment and staying in recovery. However, it is important to understand the difference between enabling and supporting, which can mean the difference in getting treatment or not. Some ways to exercise compassion include:
-Open questions
-Family inclusion in therapy
-Listening and acknowledging the pain
-Working on understanding addiction
-Emphasizing care and concern

When someone suffers from addiction, it is common that they will also suffer from a decline in physical health, mental health, and poor hygiene. Encouraging the person affected to seek treatment for their health issues can help them understand the toll their addiction is taking on their life. Establishing a structured environment, encouraging healthy eating habits and exercise can help the person affected to want a healthier lifestyle overall, and seek out treatment.

If you are trying to help save his (or her) life by getting the drinking to stop, recognize that you are not in the wrong. You just need help.

Never hesitate to contact us to get professional help in this situation. Our nearest center can advise you on how to proceed in this tricky situation.

How Do You Get Help For Alcoholic Mother

Alcoholism can lead to emotional, physical, mental, and financial abuse and neglect of children of all ages. This is especially true of children who still live with or nearby their alcoholic parent. Although less damaging, alcoholism can also cause a parent to act in ways that are extremely embarrassing, or even humiliating, to their children and themselves.

It may be difficult to tell whether your parent is an alcoholic or not. You may be worried that he or she is drinking too much and want to help.

Alcoholism is a disorder in which the person has trouble controlling his or her drinking and continues to drink despite negative consequences, such as health, financial or relationship problems. Drinking a beer or a glass of wine once and a while does not necessarily mean that someone has a problem with alcohol. Alcoholism can affect anyone, and it is often family members who are the first to call for help. However, it can be difficult when the woman you looked up to and admired all your life has a drinking problem. Fortunately, there are a lot of options to consider when deciding on how to help an alcoholic mother.

In the past, a confrontation was considered the best way to deal with an alcoholic. But recent research has shown that this tactic can be counterproductive and may not help the loved one to acknowledge his or her addiction. If you confront your parent, he or she may become defensive.

You might want to try these tips.
Tips for Talking to Your Parent
-Try to catch your mom or dad when he or she is trying to quit drinking. –This means that he or she has acknowledged the problem and wants to fix it.
-Make sure to speak in a kind, gentle, and sympathetic way. This communicates genuine concern to your parents, and he or she may respond in a more positive way.
-When you get upset or frustrated by your parent’s alcoholic behaviors, remind yourself of his or her positive traits when sober. This will help you to keep things in perspective.
-If the person is receptive to getting help, you can suggest treatment options.
-Try to have a one-on-one conversation with them. It may be less intimidating than staging an intervention with several people. Find a time when you can be alone together and free of distractions or interruptions.
-Try to use non-blaming language and avoid raising your voice or getting angry. Do not villainize the person.
-If they are not ready for treatment yet, don’t push it. Let some time pass, and try approaching them again. If they continue to refuse help, you can gather other loved ones and a professional for an intervention.

Be Supportive
If your parent is interested in entering a recovery program, here are a few things you can do to support him or her:
-Use loving and encouraging statements. These may make your parent feel more confident that he or she can become sober.
-Make self-care a priority. Attend a meeting for dealing with someone else’s drinking problems. You will be able to share your experiences with your peers and learn to cope with difficult situations.
-Take time for activities you enjoy, and make sure you’re getting enough rest.
-Support your parent as he or she researches different treatment programs and offer to attend therapy or a 12-step meeting with him or her.

Recovery takes time, and you may need to be patient with your mom while she completes a program and adjusts to being sober. You may also have to adjust to your parent being sober and the changes that will create in the home. To maintain sobriety, your mom should continue to participate in some form of aftercare after leaving a treatment program. Types of aftercare include 12-step meetings, sober living homes, and individual or group therapy.

How Do You Get Help For Alcoholic Father

In the past, a confrontation was considered the best way to deal with an alcoholic. But recent research has shown that this tactic can be counterproductive and may not help the loved one to acknowledge his addiction. If you confront your parent, he or she may become defensive.

Alcoholism may not be easy to detect. Alcoholics tend to downplay the extent of their drinking or seem to function normally, even while intoxicated, so it may not be obvious that they have a problem. If your father drinks too much, he may exhibit some of the following behavior:
-Drinking alone or hiding excessive drinking
-Dramatic mood shifts
-Using alcohol to take the edge off or to self-medicate when feeling anxious
-Interpersonal problems
-Driving under the influence
-Inability to work or carry out other responsibilities
-Recklessness
Although alcohol abuse does not necessarily indicate that a person is an alcoholic, if your father craves alcohol and needs it in order to follow his daily routine, he is an alcoholic.

You might want to try these tips.
Tips for Talking to Your Father
-Try to catch your dad when he is trying to quit drinking. This means that he has acknowledged the problem and wants to fix it.
-Make sure to speak in a kind, gentle, and sympathetic way. This communicates genuine concern to your parents, and he may respond in a more positive way.
-When you get upset or frustrated by your parent’s alcoholic behaviors, remind yourself of his positive traits when sober. This will help you to keep things in perspective.
-If the person is receptive to getting help, you can suggest treatment options.
-Try to have a one-on-one conversation with them. It may be less intimidating than staging an intervention with several people. Find a time when you can be alone together and free of distractions or interruptions.
-Try to use non-blaming language and avoid raising your voice or getting angry. Do not villainize the person.
-If they are not ready for treatment yet, don’t push it. Let some time pass, and try approaching them again. If they continue to refuse help, you can gather other loved ones and a professional for an intervention.

Be Supportive
If your parent is interested in entering a recovery program, here are a few things you can do to support him or her:
-Use loving and encouraging statements. These may make your parent feel more confident that he or she can become sober.
-Make self-care a priority. Attend a meeting about dealing with someone else’s drinking problems. You will be able to share your experiences with your peers and learn to cope with difficult situations.
-Take time for activities you enjoy, and make sure you’re getting enough rest.
-Support your parent as he or she researches different treatment programs and offer to attend therapy or a 12-step meeting with him or her.

Recovery takes time, and you may need to be patient with your dad while he completes a program and adjusts to being sober. You may also have to adjust to your parent being sober and the changes that will create in the home. To maintain sobriety, your dad should continue to participate in some form of aftercare after leaving a treatment program. Types of aftercare include 12-step meetings, sober living homes, and individual or group therapy.

If your parent is struggling with alcoholism or other substance abuse issues, help is out there waiting for you. Contact us now because our treatment expert today is at your service who will help you with the rehab facility that will get your parent back on the road to recovery.

How Do You Get Help For Alcoholic Teenager

Teens are particularly vulnerable to drinking because their impulse control has not yet fully matured.

Many teens do not have the mental capacity to fully understand the consequences of drinking or even be aware of them. Teens can face immediate negative consequences, such as brain damage and delayed puberty. Indirect health issues, such as car crashes and sexual assaults, are also common problems from drinking.

Abusing alcohol at an early age can lead to serious long-term consequences for a person’s health. Alcohol abuse as a teenager increases the risk of other substance abuse and addiction patterns, leads to problems in brain development, and harms internal organs like the liver. It is important to know how to help teens who may struggle with alcohol use disorder by recognizing the signs and finding appropriate treatment options. Underage drinking affects not only the drinker but society in general. This is because intoxicated teens can make impulsive decisions regarding driving under the influence and causing fights, acts that get people hurt or even killed.

People who begin drinking before the age of 15 are at much greater risk for developing other substance abuse problems and struggling with polydrug abuse engaging in risky sexual behaviors or becoming the victim of sexual assault or getting into serious accidents, especially car crashes or physical fights.

During adolescence, brain development rapidly increases. One of our neuroscientists calls this period a time of heightened neuroplasticity, when the brain, especially the prefrontal cortex, grows rapidly and develops millions of new connections. Alcohol inhibits the function of some areas in the brain, which can damage their structure, leading to reduced neuroplasticity, changes to the shape of some areas in the brain, poor memory, reduced cognition, and reduced ability to learn new things. This damage also increases the risk of mood disorders and some other mental illnesses.

We know that this is incredibly difficult for you. You never dreamed your child would need rehab, and wishes the alcohol issue would just go away on its own. But imagine this scenario if you saw a gaping wound on your child’s arm, you would immediately bring them to do the doctor.
Similarly, alcoholism is a disease that requires medical treatment. Just like an open wound, alcohol addiction will only fester and worsen if left untreated.

The longer that your child’s alcohol abuse continues, the dire consequences and the more difficult the treatment will be. Talk to your child as soon as you can about any issues you’re seeing. They need you now more than ever they cannot fix this problem on their own. We can help you through it.

Confronting addiction can be tricky. Understand that conversations are more effective than confrontations nobody responds well to accusatory remarks. That said, there are a wrong way and a right way to broach the subject.

Here are some of our most effective tips:
-Wait until they are sober, if possible
-Offer concern, not judgment
-Be prepared for pushback
-Stay calm
-Tell them that you love them
Lastly, -Get professional help
Get your trusted therapist in addition, your child’s school guidance counselor, or one of our addiction specialists here are willing to help, we are confidential in terms of nursing your child’s state and we are available for a free consultation.

If you are a teenager or know one who is struggling with alcohol abuse or addiction problems, we can help. There are many programs that specialize in treating addicted teens.

How Do You Get Help For Alcoholic Adult

If you grew up with a parent who had a drinking problem, you probably hoped everything would be ok once you moved out. But chances are, things haven’t gone as smoothly as you’d wished. And you’re not alone.

This first set of tips should a no-brainer, but often isn’t. One of the biggest challenges of how to get someone to stop drinking is curtailing your own activities that subtly encourage that person to keep drinking.

Often a family member or a close friend unknowingly becomes an enabler to an addict or someone who abuses alcohol. An enabler is a person who unwittingly creates opportunities so that a loved one can indulge in their addiction. Of course, their intention is not to fuel the addictive tendencies, but many people don’t realize that their seemingly harmless actions can backfire.

So to start, here’s a guide on what to do to help an alcoholic:
-Don’t cover up for them
When you cover up or make excuses for an alcoholic’s behavior, you unknowingly give them the idea that you approve of what they’re doing, or “have their back” when it comes to their unacceptable habits and actions. Besides, covering up is often an indication that you are probably in denial yourself about your loved one’s alcoholism.

-Don’t bail them out from jail
There are countless examples of an addict deciding to seek help in quitting alcohol after hitting rock bottom and realizing what a mess his or her life is in. So if he or she lands up in jail on DUI charges or for indulging in alcohol-related crimes, don’t bail them out. Let them realize how alcohol has taken over their lives and the hazards of the slippery slope they are hurtling down. This can be one of the hardest parts of how to help alcoholic friends or family, but it’s an essential one.

-Don’t take over their responsibilities
When you take over an alcoholic’s responsibilities, you give them permission to pursue their addiction. They get the idea that you approve of their habits and that it is okay to carry on as they currently are. Don’t shield an alcoholic from the consequences of not carrying out his or her work, school, or family duties. Let them face the music, so they realize how alcohol is damaging their lives and relationships.

-Don’t loan them money unless they have landed in a hospital
Alcoholism is an expensive habit to sustain. So the need for funds to sustain the addiction is always present. As sad as it may sound, an alcoholic will stoop to lying to obtain funds from you. They will invent lies like having to pay the rent (while probably spending their nights in bars and their days sleeping on park benches) or to buy groceries (when in reality they couldn’t care less about preparing and eating nutritious meals) to obtain money from you. If you are certain that a loved one is an alcoholic, don’t loan him or her money unless he or she has landed in a hospital or recovery facility and needs funds to undergo some treatment.

-Don’t take part in drinking sessions with an alcoholic adult friend or family member.

Probably the number one tip on how to get an alcoholic to stop drinking is don’t go out drinking with them. When you take part in these drinking sessions, you encourage his or her habit. It doesn’t matter if you drink just a tiny bit of alcohol or even a Coca-Cola. An alcoholic will interpret your very participation in the drinking session as an endorsement of his or her addiction, a message that it’s ok.

Start with your own mindset
Educate yourself on the nature of substance abuse or addiction
knowledge is power. The more you learn about the nature of alcohol abuse and addiction, their neurological roots, and how alcohol works on the mind and psyche of a person who abuses alcohol, the more you can empathize with your loved one and understand what he or she is going through.

Be compassionate
Addiction is not a moral flaw. It is the result of a complex interplay between genes, hormones, and the environment. When you get the facts straight, you can be compassionate when you confront a loved one who is an alcoholic. Don’t take the moral high ground and make him or her feel like a loser. On the contrary, displaying compassion and understanding can encourage an alcoholic to confide in you about the stresses that may have made him or her seek refuge in drinking. Don’t blame yourself for somebody else’s drinking habits.

You can’t work on his or her genes. You can’t alter the way he or she reacts to the addiction triggers present in the environment. You are not responsible for a person choosing to carry on drinking or not seeking help. In fact, the more you blame yourself, the more stressed you can become. What is more, your loved one can manipulate you and work on your feelings of guilt to extract money out of you.

Don’t go through the process of recovery alone. Get in touch with us.

How Do You Get Help For Alcoholic Spouse

It is important to know how to help an alcoholic spouse, being a significant other. Alcoholism can lead to severe emotional and health problems not only for alcoholics but also for their families. An alcoholic’s spouse is often forced to bear one of the largest burdens of all. You are not helpless, though, and there are several ways to receive support and help if you have begun to suspect and complain.

Living with a spouse or a partner who abuses alcohol can be incredibly difficult and even frightening. You may not be sure whether the person’s drinking is a serious problem or not, or how to get help if the drinking is disrupting the lives of you and your children.

An alcohol use disorder is a clinical disorder that is associated with the dysfunctional use of alcohol. The use of alcohol can impact a person’s life in a number of areas including his or her occupational functioning, social life and relationships, emotional and psychological functioning, and even his or her physical health. The disorder can range from mild to severe.

One of the first things that spouses of alcoholics can do to help their significant others is attempting to understand what alcoholism is and what mental and physical hardships are experienced by an alcoholic. Alcoholism is a disease and shouldn’t be underestimated. It is characterized by a physical dependence on alcohol. It can be very difficult to remove this dependence, especially on one’s own. Alcoholics feel strong, Understanding the extent of alcoholism and maintaining realistic expectations will help both you and your spouse.

Alcohol dependence occurs not when a drinker simply can handle large amounts of alcohol, but rather when he or she needs to drink any quantity of alcohol in order to avoid withdrawal symptoms or to be able to carry out his or her normal daily functions and responsibilities.

Here are some types of behaviors that may signal an alcohol use disorder include:

-Consistently drinking more alcohol or drinking for longer periods of time than originally intended.
-Consistently experiencing strong desires or urges (cravings) to drink alcohol.
-Having a number of failed attempts to cut down or control drinking, or having a persistent desire to cut down or control alcohol use and being unable to do so.
-Being unable to fulfill important obligations, such as obligations at work, school and at home due to alcohol use.
-Spending a great deal of time using alcohol, trying to get alcohol or recovering from alcohol use.
-Giving up or significantly cutting down involvement in certain activities that were once important, including activities related to work, relationships or recreation.
-Continuing to drink alcohol despite having significant problems due to alcohol use.
-Repeatedly drinking alcohol in situations where it is dangerous to do so.
-Showing tolerance to alcohol or needing to use more alcohol to achieve the same effects that were experienced earlier at smaller amounts.
-Displaying withdrawal symptoms when cutting down on alcohol use or stopping altogether.

Alcoholics often become emotionally unstable in addition to their debilitating physical condition. Emotional instability can translate into a number of other problems that affect the alcoholic’s spouse and family. Among these problems are conditions like apathy towards work, family, and social exchanges. Alcoholics often lose sight of their prior goals and values and can only focus on getting more alcohol.

When the continued dependence on alcohol is combined with the normal stresses of everyday living at home, work, or school, the way that an alcoholic thinks can become distorted, leading to relationship complications with coworkers, friends, and, most of all, the spouse and family.

Once people suspect that their spouses are alcoholics and that alcohol is preventing them from functioning normally, it is important to seek help. If you would like to know more about how to help an alcoholic spouse, please call us for more information on the various options that are available to you. The number is always toll-free, and the people are there to help 24/7 at your service.

How Do You Get Help For Alcoholic Sister

Has your sister ever called you late at night, drunk, asking you for money or a place to stay? It can be painful to witness the downward spiral of a sibling suffering from alcoholism. As a family disease, alcoholism takes its toll on every family member in a different way. So, if someone close to you drinks too much, why not explore the help offered by Al-Anon Family Groups?

Causes of any addiction, including alcoholism, are a complex combination of genetic risk; current environment, including stress; and family history of substance abuse or mental illness. While many people have these risk factors and do not struggle with alcohol use disorder, about a million people in the United States develop this addiction. Many people know someone struggling with some form of problem drinking, which can become alcohol addiction. These may be friends, family members, even siblings. It is important to know how to help a family member like your sister if they struggle with alcohol abuse.

If your sister is struggling with alcoholism, there may be women-specific treatment options that can help. Planning a family-based intervention, finding detox programs that understand how women react differently to alcohol, and identifying female-centered rehabilitation programs can all be ways to help a sister who suffers from this condition.

If a person’s behavior changes, they begin to neglect their appearance or personal responsibilities, or they smell like alcohol and slur their speech most of the time, they may be struggling with problem drinking. Here are a few steps to helping a loved one, such as a sister, if they are suspected of alcoholism:

-Learn about Alcohol Use Disorder (alcoholism), binge drinking, and heavy drinking.
-Find treatment resources that may work for your sister, including female-centric treatment options.
-Learn about the intervention process and which family members should be involved.
-Offer support for your sister to recover and set boundaries if she refuses help.
-Maintain boundaries if she refuses treatment and follows through with offers of help if she accepts treatment.
-Express love and concern without enabling problematic behaviors.

The disease of active alcoholism isn’t rational. You can’t reason with it. You can’t change it. As painful as it is, you must recognize that an alcoholic will use the love you have against you. Problem drinkers are master manipulators, often seizing on the benevolence of others for their own gain.

When it comes to dealing with alcoholism, the appropriate actions to take are often counterintuitive. For example, when your sister is on phone from jail, asking for bail money, your sister encourages you to provide the funds. Perhaps you’ve seen TV shows on the jail, and the idea of a loved one exposed to that environment horrifies you.

Truth is, by bailing the alcoholic out of these problem scenarios, you pad the consequences of their drinking. “Padded consequences” prevents alcoholics from experiencing the genuine effects of problem drinking. It isn’t easy to admit an inability to help a troubled loved one. It’s even harder to confess to yourself that in the face of alcoholism’s debilitating presence, your best efforts to battle it is inadequate.

Attend open meetings of Al-Anon Family Groups. Without question, the most peculiar aspect of alcoholism is its contagious nature. The disease actually spreads to those close to the drinker. It causes anger, frustration, disappointment, doubt, denial, codependency, and dishonesty. The list could go on ad infinitum.

In some cases, family and friends begin to interact with the alcoholic in the same way the alcoholic interacts with booze. They use their beloved problem drinker to feel different. It is vital to seek support and arm yourself with tools, especially if someone close to you suffers from the disease. Al-Anon Family Groups are a great place to start.

Recovery is Worth Fighting For. We are all here to help you.

How Do You Get Help For Alcoholic Brother

Watching a loved one become an alcoholic can be hard, especially when it is a sibling. The good news is that you can learn how to help an alcoholic brother so that he can get his life back on track. The first step to getting help is to recognize that he has a problem. The second step is to help him recognize that he has a problem. The third step is to help him find treatment for his disease.

If you are wondering how to help your addicted brother, there are several actions you can take that will help him without enabling him. Offer your brother the support and sympathy he needs. If you want to help with living expenses, make payments directly to creditors instead of giving him cash. Since addiction is a disease, do not try to help your brother without seeking expert advice. A physician or addiction counselor can give you the information needed to help your brother make good decisions. If you need help finding the best private addiction treatment center for your brother, we can help.

People with alcohol addictions do not often readily admit that they need help. Some addicts even refuse help when it is offered, leading to addiction-related medical and psychological complications. In fact, untreated addiction costs the United States more than a billion per year, according to research. So the first step in learning how to help your addicted brother is making sure he is ready to accept your help.

There are several other factors to consider if you want to help your brother who is on alcohol use disorder. The use of alcohol may slow fetal development and cause other health problems. Nutrition and weight are also important considerations for them addicted to alcohol. Some substance interferes with a normal appetite, so your brother may not be getting the nutrients he needs. A nutritionist or dietitian can help you develop a healthy eating plan to meet your sibling’s specific nutritional needs.

If you have children or a significant other, you also have to think about how helping your brother will affect them. As much as you want to help your brother with his addiction, it may not be a good idea to offer him a place to live if you also have children living in your home. Dealing with an alcoholic brother may also affect the relationship you have with your spouse or a life partner.

Once you have determined that your brother has a drinking problem, you can then begin to assess if he is actually an alcoholic. Remember, not everyone who has a drinking problem is also an alcoholic; however, even people who are not alcoholics can still have problems in their life caused by alcohol.

The main factor in determining if your brother is an alcoholic is if he has a physical dependency on alcohol. Alcoholics cannot abstain from alcohol without going into withdrawal. If your bother can abstain from alcohol but chooses not to, then he is likely a problem drinker and not an alcoholic; but he still needs help.

Getting help for an alcoholic or problem drinker is possible with a little professional guidance. You and your brother might be close, but he may not want to hear what you have to say about his drinking. Someone who has had experience working with alcoholics and other addicts will be able to give you sound advice on how to talk to your brother about his drinking so that it does not scare him off.

It can be difficult to convince an alcoholic or problem drinker to seek treatment, so it is helpful to have a professional walk you through the process and tell you what to do and not do before you try to talk to your brother.

It is never too late to get help for your brother if you think that he has a drinking problem or may be an alcoholic. You may actually save him from other negative consequences, like job loss and legal trouble. To get help, call our secure hotline to learn how to help an alcoholic brother, today. Our confidential service is open 24 hours a day, allowing you to seek help at a time that is best for you.

How Do You Get Help For Alcoholic Loved One

Do not stress by expecting results right after the first meeting, especially with your loved one. Do not expect an alcoholic to call in on an addiction counselor or visit a rehab clinic right after talking with you.

Instead believe that by confronting your alcoholic loved one, you are opening the channels of communication. You are giving him or her the chance to mull over the problem and feel motivated to quit alcohol. By showing that you care, you are assuring the person that you have only his or her best interests in mind. So in a later meeting, he or she will be more receptive to your suggestions.

Confronting an alcoholic is challenging. One thoughtless comment can send the person back to his or her world of demons and darkness. One misplaced remark can close the doors of communication forever. It is up to you to steer the confrontation, so you can persuade him or her to seek professional help to give up alcohol.

Is confronting an alcoholic risky?
Confronting an alcoholic can be very risky if the confrontation is not properly planned and prepared. One thoughtless comment can make the situation more difficult to handle. It will be harder to persuade the person to give up alcohol and seek professional help.

Here’s what you should keep in mind when you confront an alcoholic to ensure the interaction is healthy and the outcome is favorable:
-Choose a time when he or she is sober
The presence of alcohol in system clouds thoughts and makes a person unable to think straight. So confronting an alcoholic when he or she is drunk is not a good idea. He or she will not be able to appreciate your motivations. Nor will the person be able to figure out what is good for him or her.

-Don’t blame him or her
Do not turn the meeting into a blame game. If you are trying to help an alcoholic husband, don’t accuse him or her of being selfish. Same if you are trying to help an alcoholic wife, sibling, or adult child. Think for a moment. Would you blame someone for catching an infection or having cancer?

-Learned about addiction and how quickly abuse turns into an addiction and be compassionate. Blaming an alcoholic will make him or her feel bitter and distraught. He or she might even drink more to quell the surge of negative emotions. Let an alcoholic know how his or her actions are affecting you and the relationship you both share. Don’t use the accusatory “you” tone when you converse with an alcoholic. Instead, steer the conversation towards yourself. This will make the other person more comfortable and more willing to hear you out.

-Explain to the person how his or her habits have affected you the mental and emotional stress you are going through and the additional physical and economic burden that you have had to take on. Explain how his or her drinking habits have strained the relationship you share. If you are trying to help an alcoholic family member, gently point out how often he is not home or how she hardly cares about spending time with you or the kids.

Often alcoholics are swayed more by the effects of their addiction on their loved ones than those effects on their health or jobs.

-Don’t fall for his or her promises to turn over a new leaf
A conversation about one’s drinking habits is uncomfortable, especially if the person is in denial mode. An addict might want to wiggle out of the conversation by (falsely) promising that he or she will give up alcohol. High-functioning alcoholics especially are known to be master manipulators.

-Don’t fall for such promises, and instead leave them to their own devices. A good rule of thumb is “Listen to what they say, but watch what they do.” Make sure that you follow up and are prepared to confront them once more if they don’t stick to their promises.

Keep Calm
A confrontation with an alcoholic can turn into a stressful situation for you too. An alcoholic might blame you for his or her addiction or suggest that you are blowing the situation out of proportion. If an alcoholic is in a denial mode, he or she will have constructed rational-sounding reasons why they think you are overreacting. Also, remember that an alcoholic is someone who is physically dependent on alcohol; he or she has to drink to relax, to steady the nerves, and to feel that life is under control. For alcoholics, quitting alcohol means losing a companion or a refuge, not to mention having to go through a number of unpleasant withdrawal symptoms that can make their lives feel like they are living in hell. It is no wonder that most alcoholics react aggressively at the mere suggestion that they stop drinking.

Be calm. Remember what you are doing trying to help someone with an alcohol problem. Don’t make an alcoholic more aloof or hostile by spewing angry words yourself. You risk making him or her angry enough to walk away. If that happens, you may never be able to broach the subject with them again. Besides, if you are calm, the person in front of you may eventually calm down himself or herself, and then you will have succeeded in creating another window of opportunity to make your point.